Why major food companies come clean to promote their goods

Organic food manufacturers are like small farms operated by nice, friendly families who care about their consumers. This personification is exactly what the propaganda around organic foods is all about. Front groups have the power to make every consumer pay more for a product that he uses on a regular basis, whether it’s good or bad. We all have our own opinions when it comes to food companies. We think some of them are good because their advertising campaigns are extremely convincing, and not necessarily because their products truly beneficial for our health.

Of course, this doesn’t mean all food companies are bad. Food PR campaigns have gained a lot of recognition over the years, because short stories on food-related magazines and blogs can push your business straight to the top.

Courtesy Genera lMills

Courtesy Genera lMills

Food companies want to come clean, but front groups are doing the dirty work

Food companies are constantly looking for ways of making people buy their products. Their latest strategy was to lay out their manufacturing techniques. McDonald’s for example, claims they don’t have any secrets regarding their cooking measures, and to prove they have nothing to hide, they’ve invited the media to poke around their kitchens to see where the magic happens.

Unlike other junk-food companies out there, McDonald’s took a risk and we must applaud them for that. They invited people into their kitchens to prove them their ingredients are not made of plastic. Of course, this doesn’t change the fact that the food is bad, but at least they’ve been courageous enough to come clean.

Corporations such as Kraft Foods have decided to compromise and create their own organic foods. We cannot help but to admit that the move was very clever and that it brought them a wide range of clients from all over the world. The company doesn’t only maintain its brand loyalty, but it also proves that it has the ability to think of their future and of new ways to attract customers.

McDonald's

Courtesy Gerard Stolk

Are all food companies willing to come clean?

No. Some of them assume they’ve got nothing to hide, so they don’t see any reasons to come clean. ConAgra, Monsanto and Coca-Cola have exemplar public relations teams, and in their case the front groups are in charge with the advertising part.

The well-known Alliance to Feed the Future is a front group that clearly stated its mission: to enhance the necessity of having modern food technology and production techniques to suit the global requirements. However, if we take a look at its founders we will come across names such as CropLife America, the American Meat Institute, the United Egg Producers, and Grocery Manufacturers Association. Isn’t it obvious that the intentions of this group have nothing to do with helping consumers?

American Council on Science and Health

The president of ACSH wrote an article about the greatest unfounded health scares that took place in 2010. The article was published in the Daily Caller and it listed soda as one of these scares. Even though its goal seems to be that of adding reasons and balance to the current situation, the group is backed by General Mills, Coca-Cola, and Kellogg, names that make everything become so much clearer.

Coca Cola

Courtesy D Kho

Animal Agriculture Alliance

The president of Animal Agriculture Alliance stated that the people involved in the food chain should combat outrageous claims made by animal rights extremists, so they’re trying to ensure consumers that they take good care of their animals. Even though the companies that fund the group haven’t been cited, it’s clear that their only goal is that of promoting and protecting conventional methods related to animal agriculture. Most people who know exactly how meat is processed are against the use of antibiotics and hormones, as well as against animal confinement.

Front groups of major food companies are now more willing than ever to cross the line for their corporate image. They admit that they’re owned by some of the strongest organic food brands on the market, and they’re still trying to fool consumers by claiming their only interest is to make them happy. People believe what they see, and right now food PR companies are winning ground. Rather than using front groups, asks a food public relations corporation to help you with the marketing side of your business, seems a lot more convincing.

We think we know everything about food, but we don’t. As much as we want to believe what our eyes see, sometimes it’s impossible to look away. The bad news is that people are not trusting food companies anymore and that can be an impediment for honest food providers out there who use organic and healthy ingredients to sell their business.

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