The Future of Influencers and Marketers

Like most of the workforce, influencers were also hard hit by the pandemic. Before COVID-19, more than three-fourths of marketers (78%) told Linquia’s fourth annual State of Influencer Marketing Report that they’d consider working with micro-influencers this year. Of those polled 57% informed the influencer tech company that they were increasing their 2020 budgets for influencer marketing. But after the pandemic was declared, many marketing budgets were either cut or redirected to other priorities as consumers sheltered in their homes.

What Else Changed?

COVID-19 produced a new crop of influencers. Medical professionals and others on the front lines began appearing on social media. Even some grocers, delivery people, and others who consumers wanted to hear from popped up.

Other influencers who now had more time on their hands donated their presence toward charitable efforts. They not only dispensed information freely but also urged followers to donate to groups like WHO, the CDC and other nonprofits dealing with COVID-19.

Gearing Up

As calls to reopen the U.S. intensify, influencers, too, are preparing for a crush of work as brands consider restarting their marketing campaigns. Consumers will be looking for and relying on the trusted voices of influencers to help guide them through re-entry. A study this June by general medical journal JAMA Network Open reported that people are twice as likely to employ safe practices when they see influencers on social media and the news. Former Food and Drug Administration commissioner Dr. Mark McClellan said younger audiences in particular need to hear these messages, not only from government officials, but particularly from influencers and people they respect. He is presently director of the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy.

The CEO of Influential, Ryan Detert, believes that COVID-19 created the perfect stage for micro and nano influencers. Detert said it’s more relevant than ever today to hear real stories from real people since many consumers are still at home or working remotely. This public, he added, wants to be informed or entertained by influencers they’ve already connected with on social media. What Detert says makes a lot of sense since more people also flocked to and relied on social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook and YouTube for advice during the pandemic.

Data gathered before the pandemic by influencer marketing software company Tomoson revealed that influencer marketing was the most cost-effective online customer acquisition channel along with email. It even beat out organic search. In addition, the firm reported that brands had been averaging returns of $6.50 for every dollar spend on influencer marketing. The top 13% of companies surveyed, they added, saw returns of $20 or more.

Finally, Tomoson said more than half the marketers surveyed (51%) believed they secured a better quality of customers as a result of influencers. This was attributed to recommendations spreading among family and friends via trusted influencers.

Gear Up

It’s yet unknown when the entire country will be pandemic free but as states begin reopening, brands need to plan now on recovering lost sales as quickly as possible. Leveraging influencers who already have the credibility and following are a viable option toward getting back on track as quickly as possible.

The Future of Influencers and Marketers

Like most of the workforce, influencers were also hard hit by the pandemic. Before COVID-19, more than three-fourths of marketers (78%) told Linquia’s fourth annual State of Influencer Marketing Report that they’d consider working with micro-influencers this year. Of those polled 57% informed the influencer tech company that they were increasing their 2020 budgets for influencer marketing. But after the pandemic was declared, many marketing budgets were either cut or redirected to other priorities as consumers sheltered in their homes.

What Else Changed?

COVID-19 produced a new crop of social media influencers. Medical professionals and others on the front lines began appearing on social media. Even some grocers, delivery people, and others who consumers wanted to hear from popped up.

Other influencers who now had more time on their hands donated their presence toward charitable efforts. They not only dispensed information freely but also urged followers to donate to groups like WHO, the CDC and other nonprofits dealing with COVID-19.

Gearing Up

As calls to reopen the U.S. intensify, influencers, too, are preparing for a crush of work as brands consider restarting their marketing campaigns. Consumers will be looking for and relying on the trusted voices of influencers to help guide them through re-entry. A study this June by general medical journal JAMA Network Open reported that people are twice as likely to employ safe practices when they see influencers on social media and the news. Former Food and Drug Administration commissioner Dr. Mark McClellan said younger audiences in particular need to hear these messages, not only from government officials, but particularly from influencers and people they respect. He is presently director of the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy.

The CEO of Influential, Ryan Detert, believes that COVID-19 created the perfect stage for micro and nano influencers. Detert said it’s more relevant than ever today to hear real stories from real people since many consumers are still at home or working remotely. This public, he added, wants to be informed or entertained by influencers they’ve already connected with on social media. What Detert says makes a lot of sense since more people also flocked to and relied on social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook and YouTube for advice during the pandemic.

Data gathered before the pandemic by influencer marketing software company Tomoson revealed that influencer marketing was the most cost-effective online customer acquisition channel along with email. It even beat out organic search. In addition, the firm reported that brands had been averaging returns of $6.50 for every dollar spend on influencer marketing. The top 13% of companies surveyed, they added, saw returns of $20 or more.

Finally, Tomoson said more than half the marketers surveyed (51%) believed they secured a better quality of customers as a result of influencers. This was attributed to recommendations spreading among family and friends via trusted influencers.

Gear Up

It’s yet unknown when the entire country will be pandemic free but as states begin reopening, brands need to plan now on recovering lost sales as quickly as possible. Leveraging influencers who already have the credibility and following are a viable option toward getting back on track as quickly as possible.

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