All Mexico Cheers Shoeless Indian Boys Basketball

president mexico All Mexico Cheers Shoeless Indian Boys Basketball

Courtesy the President of Mexico

Proving positively sports equipment is not what makes a champion, a South American basketball team comprised of Trique Indian boys beat the socks off all competitors at the International Festival of Mini-Basketball in Argentina. What made their feat oh so much more interesting is the fact they won barefooted.

While most people would consider being without Air Jordan Nikes a disadvantage this team of shoe-less Indian boys were not even blessed with height either.  The 2013 champions are a good deal shorter than average too.

A profile of this almost miraculous basketball team quickly reveals the kids come from disadvantage backgrounds. Readers here will identify with the sort of teasing and negativity that goes along with seemingly apparent disadvantages of height and/or social status too. However, being without shoes and overcoming the jabs and stabs life can dish out builds something far more valuable than $100 pair of pump-able sneakers, true character only comes from the test of it.

The Triqui Indian Basketball Academy (ABIM) team, from Oaxaca in Mexico, defeated 19 other international teams for this year’s title.

Labeled the “barefoot mice from Mexico”, this extraordinary team of athletes has already been heralded by none other than Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, who let everyone know it via his Twitter account.

I’m trying to imagine Michael Jordan in a hang time still without shoes. Hats off to some courageous kids.

Comments

  1. Juan says

    They are not Indians they are Native Americans unless they are from India. Right?!?

    • Phil Butler says

      @Juan. Thanks for taking the time, you are correct in that these Mexican boys are of Native American heritage. It is common, especially in the past, to refer to indigenous peoples descended from Pre-Columbian times, as Indians. As a point here, it is a bit sad in many parts of the Americas for those most closely related to the original peoples of these regions to be less fortunate on the socioeconomic scale.

      I think I would just call them brave, when all is said and done, and not meaning “brave” in the sense American western dogma suggests either.

      Again, thanks for the clarity Juan.

      Always,

      Phil

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